Category: Backchannels

Post by Professor Monserrat Bores Martinez with contributions from Professor Nadia Cervantes Perez On March 7th, sixty-three students in Spanish 108, taught by Professors Monserrat Bores Martinez and Nadia Cervantes Perez, used a combination of Piazza, a popular Q&A platform, and Blackboard, Princeton’s Learning Management System, to have a discussion forum about sexual violence and […]

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April 14, 2016

The Mcgraw Center for Teaching and Learning is proud to announce a new service, the McGraw Commons. The McGraw Commons is an online publishing platform for teaching and learning. It includes several installations of web-based teaching tools, hosted on Princeton servers. Currently, the McGraw Commons offers: WordPress: which can be used to build either traditional […]

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April 1, 2016

How do you spend the first five minutes of your class? It might make a big difference in how students learn. Here are some great tips from James M. Lang, via The Chronicle of Higher Education ( January 11, 2016): Four quick ways to shift students’ attention from life’s distractions to your course content. Source: […]

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January 20, 2016

Blackboard has several tools that allow you to assign students assessments, blog posts, discussion board items, or other forms of submitting assignments. You can also create rubrics in Blackboard to make team grading more effective, or to share your expectations with students in advance of their submitting an assignment. To learn more about these services, […]

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October 12, 2015

A backchannel is a way to keep track of questions and comments that arise during a lecture. It’s a common way to post real-time resp0nses at live events, for example, a conference. Some ways of creating a backchannel in your course are: A private twitter channel for your course (requires specific user account permissions for […]

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October 12, 2015

There are many challenges in teaching a large class, many of them pedagogical. Let’s consider a few points: In large classes, the sheer number of course participants will ensure that you are delivering a message to a mixed audience. One group of students may already have selected to major in your subject area, based on […]

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September 28, 2015