Every person is or will be “disabled” at one point in life. Some people have permanent disabilities–ones that may change in severity, but are always present. Some people have temporary disabilities– for example a sports injury that is expected to heal completely. Some people have situational disabilities — for instance they cannot hear a lecture […]

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TextSTAT is a concordance program for executing search queries on local text corpora.  Files can also be imported from the Web. The program analyzes the corpus and displays word frequency lists, concordances, and keywords in context according to search terms. A Quickstart guide is available below.  More information can be found on the TextSTAT website. […]

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In the Fall of 2013, Robert Pringle, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, taught EEB 321, Ecology: Species, Interactions, Biodiversity and Society at Princeton. In conversations with his assistant in instruction, Tyler Coverdale, (a graduate student in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology), the pair decided to try a new kind of multimedia […]

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On April 13th, Ben Johnston, Senior Educational Technology Specialist at the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, gave a faculty workshop on “Teaching with Text Analysis.” Ben, who describes himself as a proponent of “Modest DH” (digital humanities), argued for the adoption of intuitive Web-based tools that students can use to analyze large amounts of […]

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Wednesday, April 13th, 4:30 – 6:00 Frist 330 Computer-assisted text analysis tools are being used in undergraduate courses to spur discussion, formulate new avenues of inquiry, develop new interpretations of text, and analyze linguistic and cultural trends. Easy-to-use, online tools such as Google Ngrams, Voyant, and Juxta, have lowered the barriers to using these applications […]

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The Mcgraw Center for Teaching and Learning is proud to announce a new service, the McGraw Commons. The McGraw Commons is an online publishing platform for teaching and learning. It includes several installations of web-based teaching tools, hosted on Princeton servers. Currently, the McGraw Commons offers: WordPress: which can be used to build either traditional […]

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In the summer of 2013, the Special Committee on Classroom Design consulted with Lawson Reed Wilson, Jr. to review recent literature on classroom design. This review helped to inform the Report of the Special Committee, published in December of 2013. For a review of the literature on active learning, you can find a select bibliograpy […]

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In December of 2013, The Special Committee on Classroom Design published a report outlining “traditional and emerging modalities of learning on campus.” The nine-member Committee, chaired by Mung Chiang, Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering, offered five recommendations for the classroom design process: Implement more user-friendly technologies in classrooms Involve faculty and students in […]

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In a previous post, I cited this simple definition for active learning: Active learning is a process where students engage in classroom activities that promote critical engagement with course materials. Activities may include text analysis, collaborative writing, various forms of discussion or problem solving. Although active learning transfers, in part, the responsibility of learning to […]

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The classroom, East Pyne 012, is now part of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning. The classroom design includes a central seminar table and computer stations along the side walls of the room is perfect for active learning — allowing small breakout groups around the screens, and a space for the whole class to […]

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On January 4th, 2016, The Chronicle of Higher Education published an opinion piece written by 15 undergraduates, all of them writing-seminar students at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The next day, The Chronicle’s republished this piece,  A Lecture from the Lectured,  with the catchy hook: “We’re tired of sitting silently in the dark, listening to […]

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How do you spend the first five minutes of your class? It might make a big difference in how students learn. Here are some great tips from James M. Lang, via The Chronicle of Higher Education ( January 11, 2016): Four quick ways to shift students’ attention from life’s distractions to your course content. Source: […]

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